Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Mapping The Benefits Of Second Avenue Subway, And A Fine Double Bonus Zone!

(Graphics: Khan Belmond, Concept: Andrew Fine)

As the blasting on NYC's Second Avenue Subway has subsided, the buzz is just starting to begin! The cavernous stations have been blasted, the tunnels dug, and residents of the area are relieved that the shaking has ceased. Yes, the shits show continues on 2nd Avenue with the traffic disruption, platform streets, mini-sidewalks, cement trucks a plenty, and trailers stacked high. But, there is something other than dust and truck exhaust that people are smelling, and that is opportunity!

The Second Avenue Subway, by the MTA's (ever moving) target is just 33 months away! Sure, that target is likely to move, but with the area relentlessly beaten over the past several years, there is light at the end of the, err, tunnel. Savvy New Yorkers, priced out of much of Manhattan, are finding pay dirt in the much-maligned but ultimately livable Upper East Side. I have been preaching it for the last couple of years, but the pain vs. gain equation has proven too much for many until recently. But now, with articles springing up in places like The New York Times, Crain's, in the past few weeks, the trend seems to be set.

To aid my clients and friends (yeah, you too), I have devised a graphic that depicts which areas should benefit the most from the new Second Avenue Subway line. Each circle represents areas that are currently, or will be within the equivalent of a two avenue block walk from a train station. The green circles are for current 4, 5, and/or 6 train stations, and the blue circles represent the future Q train stops. You will notice that there are twice as many Q train circles, as the station entrances are staggered. For instance, the 72nd Street stop has entrances at 72nd, as well as 69th Street. The graphic is far from perfect, so use at your own discretion, and double check my info.

A Fine Double Bonus Zone!

As I developed the map, first by hand, and then by bribing an imperfect co-worker, one observation stood out to me. Yes, there is no doubt that much of the far East portion of the UES should benefit, but what about those areas where these coverage circles overlap (shaded red on the map)? If you lived on 85th and Third Avenue for instance, you will have something that the East Side hasn't seen for generations- choice! How nice will it be to choose between the East Side line, and a line that circles through Midtown, Downtown, and into Brooklyn based on where you want to go, and vice-versa? Not to mention the choice when one of these venerable lines of transportation goes down! A Fine Double Bonus Zone, is what I'll call it! Perhaps, in the future, a premium will be had not for living "West of Lex", but "West of Second", or perhaps "between the lines." Well, that is the future, but if you are shopping with the benefit of the Second Avenue Subway in mind, it is something you should be considering now.

Second Avenue Subway (MTA)
Higher Prices Migrate To The Far Upper East Side (NY Times, 3/8/14)
Landlords Dig Second Avenue Subway (Crain's, 2/24/14)
Upper East Sees Boost From Second Avenue Subway Progress (3/1/14)

1 comment:

  1. The Bronx?

    More capacity on the Lexington Ave line.

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